Remixing El Presidio

Syllabus and Schedule

 

cropped-presidio_class_logo2.jpg
University of California, Berkeley Anthropology 136e, Summer 2008 
Residential fieldschool in Digital (New Media) Documentation and Representation of Cultural Heritage    

“New Media and Interpretive Trails at the San Francisco Presidio”

SYLLABUS
Instructors

Professor Ruth Tringham, (UC Berkeley Anthropology),
Dr. Michael Ashley (UC Berkeley, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Media Vault Program)
Colleen Morgan (UC Berkeley Anthropology, GSI)
Dr. Cinzia Perlingieri (UC Berkeley Anthropology)

Dates:
M-F May 27-June 13, 8.30-5.30. 4 units.

Location
San Francisco Presidio

Course Description
The idea of this field-school has developed as a result of both the design charrette held in August 2007 by the archaeologists of the Presidio Trust to plan their research and public programs of the El Presidio (Spanish and Mexican) fort and the Presidio Trust’s new plan for the Main Post including the Anza Esplanade. Ruth Tringham is a consultant on this project. In addition the UCB Dept of Anthropology is currently administering and sponsoring a large private grant (Shaw Foundation), which includes funding for the new Coordinator of Public Programs for the El Presidio (Levantar) project at the SF Presidio.

The course is on “New Media and Cultural Heritage” and  focuses on the real world challenge of creating interpretive walks and other installations for the public that involve wireless technology, digital geomapping, storytelling etc, globally and, specifically, at the El Presidio Spanish and Mexican Colonial fort and the areas to its southeast leading towards the Mission de San Francisco (the Levantar Project). This is the current focus of research of the Archaeology Group at the  Presidio of San Francisco. The course involves the design, field trial, and documentation of these different formats of representation of cultural heritage places. The aim is to seek alternatives to permanent markers of information about places, leveraging different forms of digital media. The course will take advantage of the many specialists in these technologies in the Bay Area with whom we have contact and who have offered to contribute their help to the course (CyArk, Cultural Heritage Imaging and others). It will also build on our own research in the Remediated Places project at Catalhöyük and the SF Presidio.

Course Websites: 
Public website and blog: https://remixpresidio.wordpress.com/. This will be our active website during the course, so you will need to visit it often.
The pre-course public website has been:  http://web.mac.com/chimeraspider/Ruth_Tringham/Anthro136e_Summer2008.html
Official UC Berkeley website (B-Space): Electronic resources that are restricted to UC Berkeley campus will be distributed (mostly as .pdfs) in the “Resources” area of the BSpace course website which is accessible with a Calnet ID: Log in at https://bspace.berkeley.edu/portal . If you  have a problem accessing the website, contact Ruth or Colleen. Electronic publications that are publicly distributed will be given their URL for you to access yourselves.

Prerequisites
This course has no prerequisites but experience in and/or curiosity about archaeology, architecture, history, ethnicity, and/or the SF Bay Area as well as New Media will be very helpful. You do not have to be a technical whiz, but we require that you have patience and persevera nce as you learn the skills.
 
Location of work and residence
The daily tasks will include working in the field at the El Presidio site and the surrounding Tennessee Hollow area and in the Multimedia Lab (located in the Officer’s Club on Moraga Street the Presidio Main Post), as well as the many resource sites of the Presidio.

Participants will live at the Presidio, Building 41 (see maps at http://www.presidio.gov/) as in any other field school; they will stay in dormitory style residences on the main post. Kitchen facilities are provided in the dormitory. Students are expected to prepare their own breakfast and lunches and make their own or communal arrangements for cooking or delivered-in or eating-out evening meals.

Student Outcomes
At the end of the course, the student should be able to:
•    Demonstrate a critical understanding of the research, interpretation, and concepts of site management  of the San Francisco Presidio in the context of the worldwide management of cultural heritage sites and landscapes;
•    Critically evaluate site  management plans of cultural heritage sites and landscapes in terms of movement across them by visitors and possible paths to visitor interpretations;
•    Locate, utilize and cite the basic sources including library, internet and professional organizations for the course themes;
•    Understand and apply the concepts and rules of intellectual property in the context of re-purposing and sharing of data;
•    Understand the concepts of the preservation, management, and archiving of digital data;
•    Have gained an in-depth familiarity with the history of the San Francisco Presidio, specifically the El Presidio fort and deAnza trail, and the traditional and planned presentation of the sites in the Levantar Project;
•    Have carried out detailed research and documentation of one of the trails chosen for interpretation;
•    Have gained skill and experience in one technique of digital documentation of heritage sites and applied this to one of the trails chosen for interpretation of the El Presidio fort and deAnza trail;
•    Collaborate to produce a working plan for an interpretive trail chosen for interpretation of the El Presidio fort and deAnza trail, providing documentation  and a set of alternative plans for the installation of a digitally remediated walk;
•    Collaborate to produce a website to share the plan with the public.

Reading
The reading for this course comprises readings on cultural heritage, some specifically San Francisco and its Presidio, and others including examples of cultural heritage management plans from around the world. There will also be readings about digital documentation technologies and the sustainability and preservation of digital data and media. Reading will be from a mix of online articles, photocopied articles and extracts that have been digitized for this course.  These will be provided at the beginning of the class in the “Resources” area of the B-Space website. A number of reference books and articles will also be available for reading (but not borrowing) in the Media Lab at the Presidio. Students will be informed (and may be tested) when the reading is required.The reading list is published at: http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dc6dtrkc_1gh8r7scn

Required Reading
:
Voss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco. University of California Press, Berkeley, CA. (available at Amazon.com). For a guide to priorities in reading this book, look at the published Reading List

Some general readings include:
Bolter, J. and R. Grusin 1999  Remediation: Understanding New Media. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass.
Forist, B. 2003    Visitor Use and Evaluation of Interpretive Media. National Park Service.
Fowler, P. 2004    Landscapes for the World: Conserving a Global Heritage. WINDgather Press, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK.
Machlis, G., J. et al. 2000    A Look Ahead: Key Social and Environmental Forecasts Relevant to the National Park Service. National Park Service.
Others will be suggested on the first day of class

Assignments, products, and Evaluation
This course is an inquiry-based field and lab course and has no mid-term or final exam. To a large extent, students are responsible for their own learning, although we might have informal in-class tests to make sure the reading is not too much for you and that you have been able to both do it and make sense of it.

The main basis for your grade in the course is participation as a member of a single production team to design and provide documentation for a modular set of interpretive trails around/across/through/within the hidden/buried El Presidio, continuing along the path from El Presidio to the Mission de San Francisco (Lovers’ Lane and Tennessee Hollow), representing the Early Colonial period at the San Francisco Presidio. 

The final outcome of the course consists of four products:
1. Databases of geospatially located and “relocated” media (databases will be created using Filemaker, Portfolio, GoogleEarth, Media –self contained media asssets)
2. Project documentation of best practices 
3. Maps of the trail(s)
4. Sophie book (http://www.sophieproject.org/). The Sophie book will be the collector of all the documentation produced during the course and will serve as a base for the final presentation of the results and products to the Archaeology Lab of the SF Presidio Trust.
 

Students will be assessed on the basis of a series of milestones leading towards the completion of this collaborative team project led by the instructional team comprising the design and full and detailed digital documentation.

Milestone 1: (Due Thursday 29 May) (10%) physical description, preliminary documentation (photography) and mapping of the walk
Milestone 2: (Due Monday, 2 June) (20%) storyboard for narratives and activities related to the walk; based on documentary research
Milestone 3: (Due Wednesday, 4 June) (10%) presentation of preliminary design of the walk with narratives and activities and assets (with metadata)
Milestone 4: (Due Friday, 6 June) (20%) assets for the walk narratives and activities complete with metadata
Milestone 5: (Due Tuesday, 10 June) (20%) presentation of student contributions to the final draft of the detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets in a format (Sophiebook) that is “installation-ready”
Milestone 6: (Due Friday, 13 June) (20%) public presentation and final production of trail Sophiebook with the “installation-ready” detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets (with metadata).

Schedule:
Students will participate in all parts of the process of creating these digitally remediated interpretive trail installations, from initial research, through design, development and production. Coursework will include
•    digital critical assessment of New Media technologies that are used or potentially useful for the documentation and representation of cultural heritage places, including interpretive walks
•    The development of content for such interpretive walks at El Presidio.

The working day (M-F 8.30-7.00) is broken into 6 segments (8.30-10.30, 11-12.30, 1.15-3.30, 4-5.00, 5-5.30, 5:30-7), with a break mid-morning and mid-afternoon, and for lunch. The first four segments of the day will in general alternate between workshops, labwork (individual or team), and work on site (in the field). The last 30 mins of the day is devoted to uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries. There is no work organized for evenings or weekends, since students are expected to do individual reading and research during these hours. At least one seminar and/or film show will be organised each week. Students will have access to free wireless Internet for downloading on-line readings from the course website. You  will also have access to the library of the Presidio Archaeology Lab. Obviously students can also cross the Bay Bridge to study in the UCB library if they wish. The schedule will go something like this:

Tuesday, 27 May: 
1)    Tour of the SF Presidio (Eric Blind)
2)    Tour of El Presidio and the Tennessee Hollow/Lovers Lane trails (Eric Blind and Liz Clevenger)
3)-4) Discussion/Workshop: Introduction to the course and the SF Presidio history and organization. Logistics of staying at the Presidio. Intro to the concept of Interpretive Trails at Cultural Heritage sites. The Plan for the Presidio Interpretation: what has been done; how the course fits in to this effort. Outcomes and Schedule of the course project. Memory Map exercise (the I-Team)
5)    End of day: Move in to the dorm. Communal Pizza-fest
Reading for today: Site Management Plan of Presidio (pdf); Voss, B. L. 2002 The archaeology of El Presidio de San Francisco: culture contact, gender, and ethnicity in a Spanish-colonial military community, University of California, Berkeley. Ch 2 (pdf); 

Wednesday 28 May
1)    Workshop: Digital documentation and Interpretive Trails. Overview of Digital Technology to be learned in this course: the steps in using digital technology (select subject, record, capture digitally, edit, add metadata, create end product, manage and disseminate). What are metadata? What is location-based documentation (principles of GPS)? (the I-Team)
2)    Lab/On-site: Intro to skill building 1: Recording with still photography. Intro to the Nokia instruments
3)    Workshop: Heritage trails: the idea of paths, interpretive trails, movement and experiencing the senses of a heritage place on-site and on the Web. The role of social networking (Web 2.0 etc.) and wireless technology (iPhones, iPods, cell phones, GPS etc) in enhancing trails and paths (I-Team and Nancy van House?).
4)    On-site: Mapping the Interpretive Trail (learning to use GPS). Playing with the Nokias and GPs.
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
End of Day: Public Talk by Bob Stein, (Sophie.org). Welcome Reception for participants
Reading for today1) Ashley, M. 2002    Real Webs and Virtual Excavations: A role for digital media recording in archaeological site management; 2) Van House, Nancy  2007    Flickr and Public Image Sharing: Distant Closeness and Photo Exhibition;  Explore Interpretive Trail websites (links on the course blog: https://remixpresidio.wordpress.com/

Thursday 29 May
1)    Workshop: Bob Stein, Sophie.org, Creating and working with  a Sophiebook package.
2)    On-site: Application of photography skill to different parts of the trail. Digital documentation of the walk. Taking notes of possible stories for the images.
3)    Workshop: Capturing media assets digitally (to computer); uploading assets to Flickr. Adding geo-locational data; using Google maps;
4)    On-site/Lab: Complete Milestone 1 (Physical description, map, and simple digital documentation) of the trail project.
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Assignment: Milestone 1 is due
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.ch 6Osborn, S., E. Blind and L. Clevenger 2004    Levantar: The Presidio of San Francisco Archaeological management Strategy; Clevenger, L., E. Blind and S. Osborn  2007    Methods for Documenting Colonial California: Case Studies from El Presidio de San Francisco. Society for Californian Archaeology Newsletter 41(2):24-31
 
Friday 30 May
1)    Workshop: Defining the scope of the project. The Planning and Design process of the project: a) Researching the content for the trails. b) Bringing the technology together. Small group: teams brainstorm planning for Milestone 2 (storyboard for narratives and activities related to the walk; based on documentary research) to be done over the weekend.
2)    On-site: walking the Interpretive Trail route with these new perspectives. Taking notes for Milestone 2.
3)    Workshop. Researching the archives;  Scanning documents; Adding metadata to digital assets; managing digital media assets (using Extensis Portfolio)
4)    Lab: skill building in recording with Video and Audio
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Evening: Film Night
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.ch 7Gill, T., A. Gilliland and M. Wood  2005    Introduction to Metadata, Pathways to Digital Information, edited by M. Baca. vol. Los Angeles, CA. J. Paul Getty Trust http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/standards/intrometadata/index.html (only chapters Introduction, Setting the Stage, Glossary).

Monday, 2 June
1)    Public Workshop: Who is the audience? Evaluating the Project.  Presentations by Presidio Archaeology Education Coordinator Katie Ahern, and Dr. Robin Boast (Cambridge UK University)” 
2)    Lab: Documentary and other research and preparation of narratives (content) of trail(s) for Milestone 2
3)  On site: Presentation of Milestone 2 (storyboard for narratives and activities related to the walk; based on documentary research) for Interpretive Trail project  
4)   Workshop: The bigger context of the project: The Levantar (El Presidio) Project with members of the Presidio Archaeology Lab
5)   Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Evening: Seminar (RET and MA and CM on Remediated Places project). Communal dinner
Assignment
: Milestone 2 is due
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.ch 3, 6; Forist, B. 2003 Visitor Use and Evaluation of Interpretive Media. National Park Service; Tringham, R., M. Ashley and S. Mills, in press, Senses of Places: Remediations from text to digital performance. Visual Anthropology Review December 2007; Visit: http://www.nps.gov/hfc/products/evaluate.htm

Tuesday, 3 June
1)    Lab/On-site: exploring the archives of the El Presidio in the Archaeology Lab and Presidio Archives: maps, written documents, lithographs and other images, archaeological artifacts, research documentation
2)    Workshop: Editing digital media assets (photos, video, audio etc.)
3)    Lab/On-site: More on Geo-locating assets (Nico Tripcevich, Cinzia, Nancy); video and photography with Nokia and Hi-res instruments
4)    Workshop: Feedback on Milestone 2; intro to Milestone 3 (presentation of preliminary design of the walk with narratives and activities and assets (with metadata)
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.ch 5;Gouthro, M. B. 2007    Meaningful constructs of identity: a consumption model for heritage. In Perspectives on Impact, Technology, and Strategic Management, edited by J. McGloughlin, J. Kaminski and B. Sodagar, pp. 32-40. Archaeolingua, Budapest. (BSpace pdf)

Wednesday, 4 June
1)    Lab/On-site: Research content for narratives to build into the trail, incorporating media assets. Working in Presidio Archaeology Lab
2)    Workshop: Consultation with Interpretive Trail professionals (National Park Service, Ft. Ross (Kent Lightfoot?), Presidio Trust)
3)    Lab/On-site: project work for Milestone 3 (presentation of preliminary design of the walk with narratives and activities and assets (with metadata)
4)    Workshop: team presentation with feedback of Milestone 3: presentation of preliminary design of the walk with narratives and activities and assets (with metadata)
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Evening: Seminar: Cinzia Perlingieri: Understanding landscapes, sites, and monuments in space and time. Communal dinner
Assignment: Milestone 3 is due
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.ch 9, 8; Gonzalez, S. 2007    Making Pathways through Traditions: An Update on the Kashaya Pomo Interpretive Trail Project. Society for Californian Archaeology Newsletter 41(2):42-43; Ingold, T.  2000    The perception of the environment : essays on livelihood, dwelling and skill. ch13

Thursday, 5 June
1)    Workshop: Introducing Milestone 4 (assets for the walk narratives and activities complete with metadata): standards, protocols, requirements (Michael)
2) – 3) Lab/On-site: project work for Milestone 4 (presentation of preliminary design of the walk with narratives and activities and assets (with metadata)
4)    Workshop: Enhancing the trails with wireless technology, thinking about the implementation and installation of the trail on-line and on-site.
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Reading for todayEpstein, M. and S. Vergani 2007    History Unwired: the use of mobile and localization technologies for cultural tourism. In The Integration of Location Based Services in Toursim and Cultural Heritage edited by D. Pletinckx, pp. 15-20. Archaeolingua, Budapest. (BSpace pdf); Raffa, G., L. Roffia and M. Pettinaru 2007    Context-Aware computing for Cultural Tourism: Experiences from the MUSE Project. In The Integration of Location Based Services in Toursim and Cultural Heritage, edited by D. Pletinckx, pp. 69-82. Archaeolingua, Budapest.(BSpace pdf)

Friday, 6 June
1)-3) Lab/On-site: Working all day on team projects (Milestone 4: assets for the walk narratives and activities complete with metadata), with consultation and feedback from instructors.
4) Workshop: presentation of Milestone 4 (assets for the walk narratives and activities complete with metadata)
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries

Assignment: Milestone 4 is due
Reading for todayVoss, B. 2008    The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis, Race and Sexuality in Colonial San Francisco.whatever hasn’t been read;

Monday, 9 June
1)    Workshop: Interpretive Trails in the context of Cultural Heritage, World Heritage, Tourism, Descendant Groups, and Multiple Interest Groups. Revisiting the ultimate aim and purpose of the team projects. Discussion of reading (Cinzia, Adrian Praetzellis?, Presidio Aarchaeologists)
2)   Intro to Milestone 5: the detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets in a format (Sophiebook) that is “installation-ready”); standards, protocols, best practices
3)   Lab/On-site: Team project work towards Milestone 5 with instructors consultation and feedback. Uploading assets to database  
4)    Discussion: Feedback on Milestone 4  from group members and Presidio archaeologists.
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Reading for today: chapter (1, 9, or 12) from Fowler, P. 2004 Landscapes for the World: Conserving a Global Heritage. WINDgather Press, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK; Jameson, J. H. (editor)    1997    Presenting Archaeology to the Public (1 chapter assigned to each student); 

Tuesday, 10 June
1)-3) Lab/On-site: Team project work towards Milestone 5  with instructors consultation and feedback. Uploading assets to database
4)    Workshop: presentation of Milestone 5 and feedback from group members and Presidio archaeologists 
5)    Lab: uploading assets to the database and updating their metadata, as well as creating blog entries
Evening: Public Lecture Monique Galloway, SF Presidio US/ICOMOS intern from Sydney “The “Big Dig” site in The Rocks, Sydney, Australia. Communal dinner
Assignment: Milestone 5  is due

Wednesday, 11 June
1)    Workshop: Check in with group on progress towards Milestone 6 (public presentation and final production of trail Sophiebook with the “installation-ready” detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets (with metadata)).
2)-4) Lab/On-site: Team project work towards Milestone 6 with instructors

Thursday, 12 June
1)    Workshop: Check in with whole group on progress towards Milestone 6
2)-4) Lab/On-site: Team project work towards  Milestone 6 with instructors

Friday, 13 June
1)    Final preparation of team projects for presentation
2)    Public presentation of Milestone 6, “installation-ready” detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets (with metadata), including a walk-through on-site
3)-4) Final wrap-up of course. final production of trail Sophiebook with the “installation-ready” detailed design of the walk, its narratives, activities, and assets (with metadata). Plans with Presidio Archaeologists for future implementation of the Interpretive Trail projects at the Presidio
Evening: Celebratory party and Goodbye
Assignment: Milestone 6  is due

    Course Policies:
    ❋Participation (freely adapted from Ray Ontko’s elegant prose, http://www.ontko.com/~rayo/cs63.html)
This course is not only about learning the material in the texts, reading some new material in the library, and evaluating a few films. If it were, there would be very little reason for us to meet as a class. A good student could learn the material in about one fifth the time by studying the text carefully, working through all the assignments, and following up on many of the citations given throughout the texts and in the bibliography. Indeed, this is the point of the text.
We meet as a class for a number of reasons:
•    To discuss the material, share insights that each of us may have had while working through the materials. Doing so enables us to learn more (or better) than we might as independent scholars. In discussion, we also have the opportunity to discover our misconceptions by expressing ourselves and listening carefully to others.
•    To present our research to one another. By presenting the fruits of our individual labors we take a stand for what we believe to be true and put our own work in the light for review by our peers. This is perhaps the most important aspect of method in computer science, or in any discipline for that matter.
•    To review the work of others. We learn not only by exploring material through independent scholarship, but also by seeing others’ approaches and solutions to similar problems.
•    To develop our abilities to express our thoughts in real-time. It is one thing to be able to figure things out, and another to have the thoughts fully developed and ready for action. How well do we know the material if we can’t engage in significant discussion and inquiry?
•    To collaborate with each other in the creative process and share the sense of excitement and empowerment that comes from collectively producing work that you are proud of.
Your full participation in the course, then, is essential. Engagement in the course includes, but is not limited to:
•    Preparation. Do the readings  carefully, inquisitively, intelligently. You are responsible for your own learning
•    Punctuality. Show up to workshops, lab, and on-site sessions on time.
•    Attendance. Come to all the sessions. The class will not work if you do not attend. In order for your absence to be considered excused, you must contact Colleen Morgan. If three consecutive sessions are missed due to illness, you must submit a note from the Tang Center or your physician.
•    Workshops: Come prepared to ask questions, and ask them. Come prepared to answer questions, and answer them, even if you are not being tested on your preparation.
•    Research. Get excited about your research. Follow as many leads as you can, as deeply as you can. Make a contribution by summarizing what you have learned so that others may follow. Be prepared to be engaged and excited in other participants’ research. The class works as a team not a series of individuals. There should be a feeling of safety and mutual trust enabling students to express themselves and provide constructive feedback to others.
•    Projects and Assignments. Write and create in a way that is meaningful to others, that you would be proud to publish to the world as an expression of your intellectual integrity and character.
    Participation will be a factor of your grade.
    ❋Documented Learning Disability
    If you have a documented learning disability and are authorized to have special arrangements for assignments, please let Colleen Morgan know IN WRITING immediately at the beginning of the course.
    ❋Grading
    Grades should not be a big issue in this course. BUT If you have concerns about a grade, please talk with Colleen Morgan. If you have a dispute over a grade you have received, first try to work it out with Colleen.  If you are unable to resolve a grading issue, submit a written explanation of your concerns to Ruth Tringham within one week.  Professor Tringham retains final decision in the grading process.  She will review your concerns and consider your grade.  Please be aware that she may adjust your grade in either direction.
    ❋Late Assignments
    Late assignments will not be accepted, unless you have made arrangements with the instructors ahead of time. This is a team project so that delay in your work will affect everyone else.
    ❋Plagiarism
    Plagiarism will not be tolerated, and will result in a failing grade for the course.  See the University Student Code of Conduct for information about plagiarism. Be careful to cite all your sources of information and audiovisual assets, whether on-line or in the library. The BSpace resources have links to help you with citation of sources.

 

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